Aspiring engineers qualify for the EPro8 Challenge semi-finals

Dilworth School is celebrating two Year 8 teams who qualified for the semi-finals of the EPro8 Challenge, an inter-school science and engineering competition

Every year over 22,000 budding engineers from across New Zealand take part in the competition to test their science and engineering skills. Racing against the clock, students collaborate to solve challenges requiring them to think outside of the box, get hands on with planning and construction and learn fun engineering and electronics concepts.

On Wednesday 24 August, two Year 8 Dilworth School teams embarked on the challenge at Pasadena Intermediate School. Dilworth Team 1 was challenged to design and build a working vending machine. The team, comprised of Max Cooper, Chris Walker, Luke Wootten and Jai Waterhouse, was one of the first teams to complete the challenge within their two-and-a-half-hour timeframe. The machine was designed to count and accept $1 and 20c coins. Through electronic mechanisms constructed by the students, it successfully dispensed the product after $3 was inserted into the machine.

Competing in the Year 7-8 division, Team 1 placed 4th in the heats and qualified for the semi-finals.

Intext image Epro8 Team 1.JPG

Dilworth Team 1: Max Cooper, Chris Walker, Luke Wootten and Jai Waterhouse with their vending machine design.

At the same time, Dilworth Team 2 was challenged to design and build a fully operational road marking machine. Josh Havili, Troy Karaka, Chris Machuca and Fabian Fuimaono successfully engineered a machine with an electronically controlled whiteboard marker that moved up and down to mark precise lines.

For their final challenge the students programmed the machine write “STOP”, which they successfully completed within minutes of the final buzzer. As a result, the team placed 3rd in the heats and qualified for the semi-finals.

Intext Image Epro8 Team 2.JPG

DIlworth Team 2: Josh Havili, Troy Karaka, Chris Machuca and Fabian Fuimaono with their fully operational road marking machine. 

Fabian Fuimaono signed up for the EPro8 challenge to take what he’s learned inside the classroom and test it in the real world.

“My highlight from the day was to see how everyday machines function and use my hands to build them from scratch.”

Rather than being intimidated by the more experienced students, Troy Karaka said the environment challenged his team to get more creative.

“We tried our best, got creative with our solutions and also learned how easy it is to blow a fuse!”

Over the next few weeks, the two teams will be busy preparing to compete in the competition’s semi-finals at Pasadena Intermediate School on 21 September.

September 19, 2022